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Drug Testing & Your Right To Privacy
Posted by A. Shapiro
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“The impairment of individual liberties cannot be the means of making a point […] symbolism, even symbolism for so worthy a cause as the abolition of unlawful drugs, cannot validate an otherwise unreasonable search.” These words, spoken by U.S. Supreme Court Justice Scalia in his dissenting opinion in National Treasury Employees Union v. Von Raab, 489 U.S. 656 (1989), underline the importance of rejecting random drug testing of employees to combat the drug problem facing this nation. But unfortunately, suspicion less drug testing of employees, especially in the private sector, has been steadily growing since 1986. According to a recent survey of 1,000 companies performed by the American Management Association, 51.5% of the respondents engaged in some form of drug… Read More
Drug Testing In The Workplace
Posted by A. Shapiro
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Similarities in the war on Jews and the war on drug users are obvious. An important difference in strategy can be seen, however, in efforts to produce Jew-free and drug user-free economies. The Nazi effort included businesses owned or operated by Jews. In contrast, drug warriors rarely urge boycott of products or services provided by drug-using business people. Drug warriors continually warn of threats posed to society by drug-using workers, but we hear nothing about threats posed by drug-using business managers or owners. We hear no calls to boycott a car dealership or grocery store run by someone identified as a drug user or who employs drug users. This silence is revealing. Nazis who made war on Jews and Americans… Read More
Civic Duty & Civil Commitment of Drug Testing
Posted by A. Shapiro
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Traditionally, criminal proceedings are directed against past behavior. A failed drug patient, however, can be prosecuted because authorities are dissatisfied with prospects for the person’s future behavior. When a regime imprisons citizens because of what they might do someday, the regime is following the Nazi concept of civic duty. Formerly, civil commitment was rare. Formerly, it nurtured incapacitated citizens if they needed medical help. Civic duty has transformed civil commitment into a method of imprisoning citizens convicted of no crime. In the transcript of one civil commitment proceeding, I counted only 500 words; a single sheet of paper could hold the facts and discussion of them among the committed person, the person’s spouse, a police matron, a public defender, a… Read More
Urine Testing History
Posted by A. Shapiro
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If you’d take its advocates seriously, you’d believe that drug tests were intended solely for diagnostic, health-related reasons—and not for persecuting substance users or intimidating workers. Nothing surprising here. Favorable public perception is important to the Drug Industrial Complex and its advertising agencies, even if it means doctoring the truth. To workers caught with their pants down or skirts up, the manufacturer’s intent is academic. Who cares why the damn thing was invented when you still have to fill the cup? Urine screening is detection in its rawest form. Guilt before innocence, chemical finger-pointing, surveillance—all associations the Reagan Enforcers are eager to avoid. Diagnosis, on the other hand, sounds therapeutic. Diagnosis, on the other hand, sounds therapeutic. Brochures and trade… Read More
Follow The Money of Drug Testing
Posted by A. Shapiro
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“Urine the Money,” another outgrowth of the Reagan era is the drug testing industry. Practically unheard of fifteen years ago, the testing of one’s urine, hair and sweat is increasingly being utilized to identify and punish drug users among the population. Drug tests do not detect impairment or performance, just the minute traces of drug-related metabolites in one’s body. The American Civil Liberties Union decries this practice as a violation of the right to privacy, presumption of innocence, and freedom from unreasonable searches and self-incrimination. Furthermore, it is an invasive insult to human dignity. Nonetheless, mandatory drug testing without probable cause is a practice that is being used at an alarming rate, largely due to government mandates. According to a… Read More
Criminal Proceedings & Drug Testing
Posted by A. Shapiro
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In the 1700s, the state’s dominance over an individual in criminal proceedings was regarded as so overpowering that the Fifth Amendment guaranteed that citizens would not have to incriminate themselves through compelled testimony. In contrast, drug warriors argue that the power of an individual citizen is so overwhelming that government agents must be able to coerce self-incrimination. One method is through urine tests after arrest for any crime. Results can be used to prosecute a person for “internal possession” of a drug, or even for earlier possession outside the body. At one time the U. S. Supreme Court forbade such prosecutions. Justice William O. Douglas explained, “Words taken from his lips, capsules taken from his stomach, blood taken from his… Read More
Suppression & Repression In Drug Testing
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1937: Hemp banned. An estimated 60,000 Americans smoke “marijuana,” but virtually everyone in the country has heard of it, thanks to Hearst and Anslinger’s disinformation campaign. 1945: Newsweek reports that over 100,000 people now smoke marijuana. 1967: Tens of millions smoke cannabis regularly, with many people growing their own. 1987: One in three Americans have now tried it at least once, and some 10% to 20% of Americans still choose to buy and smoke it regularly, despite urine tests and tougher laws. Throughout history, Americans have held the legal tradition that one could not give up one’s Constitutional rights—and if someone was stripped of these protections, then he or she was being victimized. By 1989, if you sign up for… Read More
Urinalysis: Pissing It All Away
Posted by A. Shapiro
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The dream of every crude economist is to be able to account for labor (humans) as methodically as machines, raw materials, overhead, etc. Of course, it rarely works that way. Unlike machines, humans have annoying interests extraneous to their roles as “capital.” Humans think for themselves—even the dumb ones. Humans fight back. In the never-ending struggle to hammer human-round-pegs into corporate- square-holes, meet the… Piss Police “Urinalysis” involves performing arcane alchemical rites over bottles of employee urine. Consider it a peek through the ol’ urinary tract keyhole into workers’ private lives. In Canada, the High Priests of Urinal Augury lurk in the shadowy towers of the Toronto Dominion Bank. Last August, the bank was given the green light by the… Read More
Transportation Industries & Drug Testing
Posted by A. Shapiro
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Amtrak’s Colonial, with 616 passengers aboard, was traveling at 105 miles an hour when it piled into a string of Conrail freight engines heading toward Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Fifteen people were killed and another 176 injured—the worst accident in Amtrak’s history. Federal investigators said they were focusing on two possible reasons why the trains ended up on the same track: a warning whistle was disabled, and a bulb was missing from a critical signal light in the Colonial’s cab. Within days, though, Dr. Delbert J. Lacefield, chief of the Federal Aviation Administration’s forensic toxicology unit working under contract to the Federal Railroad Association, announced that he had found THC in the blood of two members of the freight train’s crew. THC… Read More
Drug Testing In House Could Stir Lawsuits
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Lawmakers who want their staff members and other Capitol Hill workers randomly tested for drugs could face a flurry of lawsuits because of prior court decisions affecting drug testing in the executive branch, the Hill reports. “If there were a random drug testing program that included me, I would consider a lawsuit,” Robert Raben, minority counsel to two House Judiciary subcommittees, told the newspaper. In interviews, several House aides who work on policy matters privately echoed him, though most declined to speak on the record. Under a House rule adopted recently, Speaker Newt Gingrich, Republican of Georgia, is creating a program for drug testing that resembles that used by the executive branch. It could be months before the House finally… Read More
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