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Gary Johnson
Posted by A. Shapiro
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Gary Johnson
Republican Governor Gary Johnson of New Mexico has recently spoken out about his belief that the war on drugs has been a failure, and he has proposed the legalization of marijuana. His willingness to challenge the establishment, especially the leadership of his own political party, has stimulated a growing national debate on marijuana policy that was long overdue, and broken the myth of consensus—that all responsible elected officials support marijuana prohibition. Interestingly, when Governor Johnson was first a candidate for governor, he publicly acknowledged that he had smoked marijuana, and that he had also experimented with cocaine. The voters of New Mexico apparently felt his prior drug use was unimportant, as they elected him to two successive terms as their… Read More
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
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Kareem Abdul-Jabbar
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is the top-scoring basketball player of all time. Born Lewis Alcindor on April 16, 1947, he grew up in New York City where he led Power Memorial High School's basketball team to a 95-6 record. He was a highly regarded prep and landed on the UCLA Bruins. Alcindor won three consecutive NCAA titles from 1967-1969, leading the Bruins to an 88-2 record. He was also named the NCAA Tournament's Most Outstanding Player those 3 years, the first and only player to do that. He was also named College Player of the Year by all the major organizations (TSN, AP, UP, USBWA) from 1967-1969. His Collegiate Success, and reputation as perhaps the best College Player of All-Time, translated into… Read More
Anita Hoffman
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Anita Hoffman
Dubbing her the "Queen of the Yippies," the UK's Economist (not exactly a radical publication) had this to say of Anita Hoffman and her husband Abbie: "Perhaps the most famous song of the 1960s was Bob Dylan's 'The Times They Are A'Changin'', in which 'senators, congressmen' and others stuck in the past were warned of the 'battle outside raging.' No one fought the battle with more enthusiasm than the Hoffmans, Abbie and Anita." The Hoffmans became the symbols of an era of resistance against racism, capitalism and war. She was born Anita Kushner in New York, to middle-class Jewish parents. Abbie had a similar background. Both had taken courses in psychology. They met at a party and took to each… Read More
Wavy Gravy
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Wavy Gravy
Born Hugh Romney, this poet, clown, activist and philanthropist changed his name to Wavy Gravy at the Texas Pop Festival in 1969, with a little help from B.B. King. Wavy was a part of the Beat movement in the late 1950s, hanging out in Greenwich Village with hipsters and folk singers like Paul Krassner, Lenny Bruce, and Bob Dylan. He was a comedian and a comic actor, working for a time at the Committee (San Francisco's equivalent to Chicago's famed Second City troupe). By 1966, he was one of Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters and living on a mountain top commune near L.A. called the Hog Farm. After a time, the Hog Farm took to the road with its members living… Read More
Andrew Weil
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Andrew Weil
He's been on the cover of Time magazine (5/12/97), has appeared on "Prime Time Live," the morning talk shows, and The New York Times. He is acclaimed best-selling author and pioneer in integrative medicine, Dr. Andrew Weil. The recipient of an AB degree in botany from Harvard University and an MD from Harvard Medical School, Dr. Weil has worked for the National Institute of Mental Health and for 15 years served as a research associate in ethnopharmacology at the Harvard Botanical Museum. He is the director of the Program in Integrative Medicine and clinical professor of internal medicine at the University of Arizona in Tucson. He is also the founder of the Foundation for Integrative Medicine and editor-in-chief of the… Read More
Brownie Mary
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Brownie Mary
Mary Jane Rathbun, better known as "Brownie Mary" died peacefully with friends at her side on the evening of April 10, 1999. Mary attracted nationwide attention several times during her 25 plus years in San Francisco. She moved to San Francisco from Reno, Nevada in the early seventies following the tragic death of her only daughter, Peggy in an automobile accident. The first of what was to be three busts for baking marijuana brownies gained national attention for her age, which was about 65 at that time and her fliers spread on Castro Street light poles advertising her wares, while working at I-Hop as a waitress. America was really taken with her defiance and course language. The result of that… Read More
Louis Armstrong
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Louis Armstrong
Trumpeter and singer Louis Armstrong was the seminal artist of jazz history—the first to combine trumpet virtuosity and an original musical vision with an entertainer's sense of presence and persona. The result would make him the most influential instrumentalist of his generation, and bring him the respect and adulation of musicians of all eras to come, as well as a vast audience beyond jazz that has never stopped growing. Case in point: The Guinness Book of World Records lists Armstrong as the oldest performer ever to chart a No. 1 hit record, an accomplishment achieved in 1964 when his record of Hello Dolly unexpectedly displaced the Beatles from the top position. And 17 years after his death, Armstrong's record of… Read More
Peter McWilliams
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Peter McWilliams
It was with great sadness that I learned of the recent death of best-selling author, Peter McWilliams. Peter was found dead in his home on June 14, 2000. The cause of his death , according to sources, was that he choked on his vomit. Peter had suffered from AIDS and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma since 1996, and had used medical marijuana to suppress the nausea that was a common side-effect to the potent medications needed to keep him alive. His marijuana use was legal, thanks to California's Proposition 215, which passed in 1996 and legalized the use of marijuana for treatment of illness. Denied his medicine (marijuana) as a result of an arrest for possessing his medicine (marijuana), McWilliams died, as there… Read More
Paul McCartney
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Paul McCartney
Paul was born on June 18, 1942, at Walton Road Hospital, Liverpool, to Mary and James McCartney. His brother Mike (McGear) was born on January 7, 1944, at Walton Hospital. After passing his 11-Plus examinations Paul entered the Liverpool Institute in 1957 where he met a younger student, George Harrison. It was through another Liverpool Institute pupil, Ivan Vaughan that Paul met John Lennon. Paul's interest in music was mainly due to the influence of his father, a keen jazz musician. Paul became an accomplished guitarist at an early age and was able to tune a guitar as well as write down the lyrics in full of popular songs of the time. This impressed the young Lennon who invited Paul… Read More
Linda McCartney
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Linda McCartney
Paul McCartney, the composer of some of the rock era's most beautiful love songs, has consistently told interviewers that all his romantic ballads written after 1968 were about Linda McCartney. Those songs include everything from the Beatles' "Two of Us" and "Oh! Darling" to "Maybe I'm Amazed" and "The Lovely Linda" on Paul's first post-Beatles album, McCartney (1970); "Long-Haired Lady" on Ram (1971) and "My Love" on "Red Rose Speedway" (1973); to more recent songs as "We Got Married" and "Figure of Eight" on "Flowers in the Dirt" (1989) and "Golden Earth Girl" on "Off the Ground" (1993). Paul McCartney was not the first to compose a song about Linda McCartney. Her father, Lee Eastman, was a prominent show business… Read More
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