Pot­ smoker­ of­ the­ month

Cheryl Miller
Posted by A. Shapiro
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Cheryl Miller, whose use of medical marijuana to ease the pain of multiple sclerosis turned her into a leading anti-War on Drugs activist, has died. She was 57. Miller passed away on June 7 in a hospital near Silverton, New Jersey. Funeral services were held in New Jersey, and her ashes were interred in her native Oklahoma. "The freedom movement has lost a very brave fighter," said LP Political Director Ron Crickenberger. "Cheryl continued to stand up for what's right long after she was able to physically stand. She did more as a bed-ridden invalid to speak out for the rights of patients than do most able-bodied activists." Miller used medical marijuana for relief from the pain of multiple sclerosis,… Read More
David Ford
Posted by A. Shapiro
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At his birth in 1928 in Ross, California, Dave Ford was blessed with extraordinary wit, energy, and initiative. By the time he graduated from high school he had already published his own newspaper, produced elaborate stage shows, created and hosted a popular radio show, and interviewed legendary Hollywood stars. He was eight when he first heard about "happy grass"—and was immediately confronted by two radically opposite views of cannabis. Ordinary people told him that marijuana eased pain and made them relaxed and peaceful. The government—and his father—told him it turned users into violent lunatics. His mother told him: find out for yourself. He did. He smoked his first joint at age 17—and in a single hour wrote the speech that… Read More
Pancho Villa
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One of our favorite revolutionary figures of the 20th century, Pancho Villa, is said to have smoked pot before going to battle to become mas valiente (more valiant). The term "marijuana" even comes from ballads sung by Pancho Villa and his army. William Hearst took the term directly from their lips to his yellow journalism propaghanda when he pushed for the prohibition of cannabis. La cucaracha, la cucaracha, Ya no puede caminar, Porque no tiene, porque no tiene, Marihuana que fumar. The song was adopted as Villa's battle hymn after his capture of Torreon and subsequent overthrow of the Mexican government because many of his men had smoked marihuana before going into battle, much like other soldiers drinking alcohol before… Read More
Ed Rosenthal
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Ed Rosenthal is recognized worldwide as an authority on marijuana. In his thirty-plus years as a cannabis expert, he has written or edited more than a dozen books about marijuana cultivation and social policy, that cumulatively have sold over one million copies. Rosenthal is a member of the International Cannabinoid Research Society and the Garden Writers Association of America, and has served as an expert witness on marijuana cultivation in federal and state trials. Rosenthal has also been active in promoting and developing policies of civil regulation for medical marijuana. Since the passage of California's pioneering Prop 215 in 1996, which authorizes medicinal use of marijuana, he has worked with the state's growers, dispensaries, and local governments to standardize and… Read More
Mark Stepnoski
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Single, resides in Houston, Texas. Hobbies include music and reading. Spokesman for Half Priced Books' "Just Read" program with Cowboys' Daryl Johnston. Attended Cathedral Prep (PA) High, lettering in football and was member of National Honor Society. Named H.S. Football All-America by USA Today and Parade Magazine as senior. Father, Marty, was teammate of Hall-of-Fame receiver Fred Biletnikoff on Erie Tech's 1960 H.S. football team. Born Mark Matthew Stepnoski, January 20, 1967, in Erie, Pennsylvania. Pro Career After a four year visit to the AFC, Mark Stepnoski returned to his NFL origins and rejoined many of his former teammates in Dallas in 1999. He brought back a very high level of play at his position, and quickly re-established himself as… Read More
Rodney Dangerfield
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Rodney Dangerfield was rushed to a hospital terrified he was having a heart attack—and to calm himself he fired up a joint right in the middle of the Intensive Care Unit! The 80-year-old comic, who has been battling heart disease for more than 10 years—was brought in by his devoted wife Joan, 49, who says her husband panics every time he feels a twinge in his chest. Rodney came into Saint John's Health Canter on Saturday night, August 31, "white as a sheet, drenched in sweat and holding his chest with both hands," an inside source revealed. "It was obvious he was in a lot of pain." He was moved to the ICU unit and left alone to change his… Read More
Irvin Rosenfeld
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By the time he turned 18, Irvin Rosenfeld had long suffered from a congenital disease that caused painful, bony, and potentially cancerous growths throughout his body. Thirty to 40 had been removed in seven operations. He had to be home-schooled through high school because he couldn't even sit for more than 10 minutes, the discomfort from the pressure on the growths was so great. Many patients search for years without finding an effective treatment for their ills, but Rosenfeld was lucky. With a thirst for independence, he decided to go to college in Miami, where he came into contact with marijuana. The first time he pulled on a joint and passed it on, Rosenfeld recalls, he didn't notice anything—until he… Read More
Bing Crosby
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Bing Crosby was, without a doubt, the most popular and influential media star of the first half of the 20th century. The undisputed best-selling artist until well into the rock era (with over half a billion records in circulation), the most popular radio star of all time, and the biggest box-office draw of the 1940s, Crosby dominated the entertainment world from the Depression until the mid-50s, and proved just as influential as he was popular. Unlike the many vocal artists before him, Crosby grew up with radio, and his intimate bedside manner was a style perfectly suited to emphasize the strengths of a medium transmitted directly into the home. He was also helped by the emerging microphone technology: scientists had… Read More
Valerie Corral
Posted by A. Shapiro
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Following an auto accident in 1973 that caused a brain trauma and resulted in my becoming epileptic, I began using marijuana as an adjunct medicine. This treatment replaced a rigorous pharmaceutical regimen. With deliberate application and mindful monitoring, marijuana was to eventually become the medicine that has continued to control my seizure activity. In 1992 I was arrested with my husband, Mike, for the cultivation of five marijuana plants. Spurred by this arrest I became involved in the campaign to legalize medical marijuana. As the first patient in the state of California to challenge existing law and based on a defense of necessity I was ushered into the legal, political and social foreground of this health issue. The spring of… Read More
Merle Haggard
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When Merle Haggard released "Okie from Muskogee" 30 years ago, the song made him a right-wing hero. Issued at the height of the Vietnam War protests, it won him praise from conservatives for the line "We don't smoke marijuana in Muskogee/We don't take our trips on LSD." Haggard always said the hoopla was overplayed, claiming he intended the song as a kind of jest. And, today, this country legend cum rugged individualist says that conservatives—especially the anti-marijuana forces—have gone too far. "America has sure gone to some sort of a police state in the last 10 years," says Haggard, who is at the Flynn Theatre in Burlington, Vt., tomorrow and Lowell Memorial Auditorium on Sunday. He hasn't played in New… Read More
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